The spy who could not spell, his buried treasure, and the code he couldn't remember

"Regan had been under surveillance for months, after a foreign source passed on a letter from an unidentified US intelligence official offering to sell information. The letter was riddled with misspellings like “enprisioned” and “esponage,” which led the FBI to look for a bad speller within the intelligence community. Regan, who was dyslexic, became the prime suspect. He would later be known as the spy who couldn’t spell."

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"It took Olson only a couple of weeks to decode the first puzzle, the note from Regan’s wallet that began “5-6-N-V-O-A-I …” It turned out to have been enciphered using a trick made famous by Julius Caesar in which all the characters in the message are shifted by a certain number of positions in the alphabet. Lining up the message on one end of a slide board, Olson shifted the letters by one place, then two places, and so on, checking the other end of the slide board each time to see if he got anything readable."

Read article at Wired Magazine>>

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